Topic: Cockpit Drains ,Again

Constantly wet cockpit sole.  Mine had that.  Reverted back to the original after the first season with wet feet.  Not recommended.

Re: Cockpit Drains ,Again

Band aid solution would be a teak grate over the floor, but then all sorts of crap gets stuck - need to clean it often otherwise it gets ugly.  Like the fridge at home after a week or two on the boat....

Re: Cockpit Drains ,Again

What if I put a checkvalve in the line? Would it still drain or do they need pressure?

Re: Cockpit Drains ,Again

While she's on the hard, I'm going to replace gasket in my engine hatch, use good rubber washers, and re-gasket all lockers, then flood the cockpit and measure how long it takes to drain, as well as how much water it holds....I think Merrill is right (well, I actually know he's right, but can't really say that, can I?!) as if you cut new cockpit drains higher up, you now have a new ingress for water, as the old ones are below water line (and crossed) so that keeps water out...it's how they have to be.  If you have a check valve, what is going to fail: the check valve - just when you need it most.  So you will have water coming in and out, therefore it won't drain?!  I would say if anything, just make what you have bigger.  That's what I am thinking of doing. 
Suggestions?  Merrill??
Speaking of check valves....I am going to investigate mine on the engine exaust port....as I don't want water coming up to my rebuilt$$$ engine that way!!!  I'm thinking of a removable plug, plugging it right up for offshore....with a big red sign on the engine controls when it is plugged off!!!

“You get a boat for only one reason, because you want one.  If you’re worried about being practical, forget boats.”

Re: Cockpit Drains ,Again

The new drains out the stern do not need to be too close to the water line because they do not need to drain the last 4 or 5 inches of water from the cockpit. Having those few inchs of water in the cockpit for a while will not endanger the boat and the original drains will take care of it. The new drains should not be too high either. If the cockpit is filled to the top, chances you are not in calm water and the boat will be rolling or heeling a fair amount, resulting in almost half of the water spilling out over the cockpit edge very quickly, so you now only need to drain half the cockpit. The original drains may look large when you have 4 or 5 people in the cockpit at anchor having drinks and the water level is at your feet, but when at sea and the cockpit is taking what seems forever to drain, they seem tiny. The chances of filling the cockpit are fairly small. With a following sea, the stern picks up very well. Breaking waves are a problem, but then it is much better to be taking those over the bow. I have used a 9ft diameter sea anchor from the bow during a gale in the Gulf Stream and was very impressed with its performance. In 11,000 offshore miles with my Contessa I have only had the cockpit 1/3 filled on a few occasions.

Re: Cockpit Drains ,Again

As Beryl Smeeton did after pitchpoling Tzu Hang near Cape Horn: just get a bucket and start bailing...

And if I may paraphrase:  Nothing gets water gets water out of the boat faster than a scared sailor with a bucket!

So, keep those bilge pumps operable, but also keep that bucket tied on to something solid in the cockpit...I have two buckets, oh, actually, three, the little canvas one is really handy and wont get ripped away like the plastic and rubber ones can.

“You get a boat for only one reason, because you want one.  If you’re worried about being practical, forget boats.”

Re: Cockpit Drains ,Again

after looking at Moonshines pictures (very nice!) at
http://www.contessa26moonshine.me.uk/ph … 4_IMG.html
I was hoping to combine a new engine hatch (I have the 3 separate panels) with One board, using the old run off channel as a seal (Merril's fuel hose idea) and cutting 2 new drains in the stern, thus draining just at or above the waterline.What are potential problems I am overlooking?