Topic: PICTURES - Finally

great pictures man.

-cody

Re: PICTURES - Finally

All i can say is WOW. I am impressed with your patience!!!  Great pics, you should now know your boat quite well!!

Is there any core in the coachroof? If so how is it doin?

Re: PICTURES - Finally

Very impressive! Thanks for the upload

Re: PICTURES - Finally

I am very impressed... a huge project!  Thanks for putting up the pics.

Re: PICTURES - Finally

Oh...my...god!!!!  And I thought rebedding a bow pulpit for the 2nd time was a bother....heavens!!!  Way to go, a true labour of love, hey?!  But you will totally know your boat after this, and she will be worth it!!!  Thanks so much for taking all the pictures!!!!  I assume there was a galley fire??  And gee, you almost had an aft cabin there for awhile!  I like your shelter setup - makes it easier for you working "indoors" like that!  We all feel for you! ;-)

“You get a boat for only one reason, because you want one.  If you’re worried about being practical, forget boats.”

Re: PICTURES - Finally

Oh, was that damage to the mast step there??  What happened, and how did you fix it?
You have done an amazing job of fixing the fibreglass openings ;-)  in the boat!!  And you are right, plywood for a core is the worst.... you cut yours right out, didn't you?  Did you replace with marine ply? Or just big slabs o' glass?  I am going to enlarge the pics at home, sneakingly looking at them all at the office here!
Thanks again, and yes, we are crazy about our boats! ;-)

“You get a boat for only one reason, because you want one.  If you’re worried about being practical, forget boats.”

Re: PICTURES - Finally

It's now an "open concept" Contessa 26.  But I have arranged for a sheet of 1/2 teak ply that will become some new bulkheads eventually.

The damage at the mast beam is just the liner cracking.  On the earlier boats, the two posts in the cabin are not attached to the floor or the mast support crossmember, so the deck will oilcan a bit.  I'm going to glass in some blocks (to the hull, thru the floor) and thru bolt the 2X2's to the crossmember.  This will take care of any compressive loads.

There sure was a galley fire, and the method for repairing came from many winter nights thinking, drinking, and bouncing lot of ideas, some stupid, off someone smarter than me:  my Dad. 

As far as the deck goes, I replaced with 3/8 marine ply.  Had to, because the liner has to go back in, and anything thicker or thinner would frig up the radius at the side deck and cabin sides.  Getting the old deck out was an exercise in patience - slowly going at it with some chisels, small prybar, long drill bits, and an air chisel (gently).   I glassed over one side of the new deck with polyester and chopped strand mat, and this is the "down" side.  I bonded the sections back up with West System, and high density filler (thanks Merrill, that really is good stuff!) with colloidal silica too.  Setting up all those sticks was really an excercise in patience and fighting gravity.  Next time, I think I'll drill out the rivets and lift the deck right off...........

There's a picture of the aft deck, up thru the hole in the transom, looking up and you can see blobs.  These are resin blobs, where the plywood was attached to the fiberglass - it's mostly a void.  That's what the forward decks pretty much looked like.  The techniques of the era....

The shelter is the catsass.  Keeps the snow out now, and none of the neighbors have complained yet...  Dad doesn't even charge me extra rent for taking up half his driveway.......

Re: PICTURES - Finally

Stefan

It looks like you had an alcohol stove... what happen... it also looks like it was too close to the bulk head... I'm only saying this because I'm thinking of doing the same thing... and it would be nice to know from your experience to maybe avoid a situation... thanks
jose

Re: PICTURES - Finally

Yeah it's an Origo 4000.  I wasnt the one that had the fire.  The previous owner had the fire off the west coast on her way to vancouver.  I don't know the particulars.  From what I've read, if you run those non press alcohol stoves for a long time (1.5+ hrs) at mid/high heat, then the fuel will spill over the cannister and catch on fire.  Seems to be what happened here.  I don't really know, nor can I explain this happenining, but I guess it's happened to some people.  I dont think I'll ever run that stove that hard or that long to find out.

Re: PICTURES - Finally

Yikes!  The fire thing with alcohol is a tad scary, as you can't really see the flame if the fluid gets loose.  A good lesson why to keep burner down lower while underway, or have to watch it...fire is fire, hey?!

I think I will have to light mine underway for long trips, but would watch it and hope to hell it was ok...mine is the Origo 3000 non-press. but is set very low into the opening, not against bulkhead, and there is fibreglass liner around, and lots of room around it, kind of like if you wanted you could build a giant icebox in the same spot - or install a big diesel stove!
When I don't use the stove, a large teak cover fits over the whole area and that is my "chart table"!

So, Stefan, what type of stove will you get?!
And thanks for sharing all your insights, very valuable!  We never know what's under or in our boats until we rip them apart!  I do like the open concept...makes it look like a mega yacht down below! ;-)  And thanks again for the many pics, they are now part of my Boat Pictures file on my computer!  And your dad sounds like the greatest!

“You get a boat for only one reason, because you want one.  If you’re worried about being practical, forget boats.”

Re: PICTURES - Finally

Alright.  It's winter now, and I've finally gotten around to resizing and uploading a selection of photos from the refit of my 1974 JJT boat.  From the getgo, I apologize for the size and quantity of these pictures:  I get the internet through a phone line (dumb Roger's Cable commercial...)

Here you'll see the hull repair I've talked about - it got hot in a fire, boiled the resin out and made a big soft spot.  I'm not big on body work (fairing and sanding) so I made the repair as easy as possible - from the inside.  By making a mold of the hull, I was able to keep the hull shape in the affected area and minimal fairing will be required outside (where you can see it.......)

As far as the decks, read all of my other rants.  Plywood is shit as far as decking goes, and the Contessa 26's is one of the tightest boats to work in.  +40 outside, means God knows how hot inside, explains the beer consumption as I worked inside all summer.  It's tight - see me grinding the aft decks out.  My feet hung out the hole in the transom.

So, in case anyone out there wanted to know, this is what a crazy person does.  I mean, this is what your early JJT looks like all apart.  A normal person would have just gone sailing and ignored half of what was wrong with my boat.  Like I said, this is what a crazy person does with their spare time.

I welcome all comments and questions.  But if you're going to criticize, I'll ask you the same question that I've asked anyone else offering advice:  "you ever cut a hole this big in your boat before?"  Not to sound arrogant or anything, but, well, I'm still young, so maybe I am.  Just a bit.

Photos are at http://photos.yahoo.ca/theuntoldwant

Don't want to use all up of Merrill's bandwidth and be unwelcome here...  Maybe the arguing will take care of that though.  Cheers

Stefan