Topic: Cockpit Floor Panels MOD

If you replace the wood, don't use aluminum. It will be instant corrosion. Mine are made of Glass filled Teflon tapped for ten 5/16-18 stainless phillips head screws.  No leaks in five years.

Re: Cockpit Floor Panels MOD

Any pictures?  I think Tania's boat had a re-inforced engine hatch too.  (there's one picture where it looks more squared off then mine, and my boat is only six boats earlier than hers.
I also like to feel that I have quick engine access: both to get in and also to re-cover...I also like to check the engine after each outing, and some kind of clips/dogged latches (in addition to screws for offshore/heavy weather) would make it quick.  Also - after hitting a log or something, one always wants to be able to see the prop shaft quickly and you can't do that with the dozen bolts.

Re: Cockpit Floor Panels MOD

While I too would like to modify the engine compartment I was considering why I might need quick access.  On my old Petter, the only reasons for quick access might be to bleed the fuel lines in the case of an air lock or to release the cylinder compression were I hand cranking (really a last resort!).  I can address the bleeding question by moving the fuel filter forward to a slightly more accessible location.  For the compression lever I could (and plan to) install a choke-style push pull wire leading to the boat's interior that I can control while I crank.

If one just needs a quick look to see what is what, there are inspection ports that can be installed in the deck panel.

These days I am thinking a lot about oars for the 300 some-odd feet from my berth to the channel.

Re: Cockpit Floor Panels MOD

As Shannon has mentioned, Aebi was plagued with a leaky engine cover and she came up with a fix that is about as good as any I have run across.  It is something I am probably going to try at some point...but with a few modifications.

In chapter 7 of "Maiden Voyage" Aebi explains the problem most of us know too well..."Something had to be done about the water that leaked past the cockpit cover, which was also the floor of the cockpit, and into the engine compartment.  Whenever waves filled the cockpit or, on land, when I took a sunshower or threw buckets of water to wash down my patio, the cockpit drains never worked fast enough to avoid major leaking down into the engine compartment.

She goes on to tell how she fixed it..."We had an aluminum frame welded that fit into another alumninum frame.  With the smaller frame bolted on to the cover, the slightly larger one bolted onto the deck, and a gasket in between, an impermeable seal was formed."

One thing I'd do differently is use square stainless steel tubing for the two frames instead of aluminum. 

Before I commit to doing it this way, however, I certainly want to know more about how Merrill fixed his!  "No leaks in five years" sounds like where I want to go. SMH -- Any chance you could add some meat to the two rather skimpy lines posted earlier on this subject?

Re: Cockpit Floor Panels MOD

I'll add a few lines but can't do it 'til early next week.  I've got five surveys backed up and lousey weather to boot.  Patience.

Re: Cockpit Floor Panels MOD

I am looking forward to it.  It will be worth the wait!

Re: Cockpit Floor Panels MOD

Assuming that the link below works, you'll see the photos.  The molded groove, that JJ Taylor put in the flange, fits 1/2" OD fuel hose quite well. Use Type "B-1" instead of Type "A-1" because it's squishier.  I mitered the corners and glooed it in place with silicone sealant. 

I used silicone because it never works on anything and I wanted to be able to remove the seal if it s--t the bed.  That wazs 10 years ago and remains as the only example where silicone sealant has worked on anything (it's like WD-40).

I originally used washers with rubber faces to make a better seal around the scroo heads.  The rubber kept falling off so I gave up on them and have used only fender washers since.

I'm not concerned with speed of removal of the scrooz.  Ashore I have the power screw driver and afloat I have a manually operated one that works well unless I'm having a senior moment. Having been a string bass player back in the sixties, my fingers are well trained for speed.

I regret that this probably hasn't been as high-tech and exciting as you may have expected. Hopefully, next time.

http://www.pocketcruisers.com/contessa% … hatch.html

Re: Cockpit Floor Panels MOD

"I regret that this probably hasn't been as high-tech and exciting as you may have expected. Hopefully, next time."

Why?  How many hours has anyone out there spent conjuring up a fix to  a simple problem?  And then how many hours spent on implementing said fix?  And then after examining results of said fix for aforementioned problem, how many of us have thought "well, I could have just done ... ". 

After seeing the photos, I'm about 99.9% sure how I'm going to seal up my cockpit floor panels now.  My '74 has the three panels, so they'd nip down even tighter on the "gasket".  As far as speed goes, I'll always have cordless drill or a speed handle on board (for then the cordless drill gets wet.  it will.  you know it will.)

Now if only I could get Merril to tell me his secret on how to fit big engine mounts in the "engine bay"....

Re: Cockpit Floor Panels MOD

Simple, cheap, quick and proven!  Couldn't ask for more.  I'll certainly try out this fix before I go to the expense and trouble of welding up a set of nesting frames. Thanks, Merrill, for adding these photos to the Contessa Corner technical information page.  Good stuff!

Re: Cockpit Floor Panels MOD

stefan_d wrote:

Now if only I could get Merril to tell me his secret on how to fit big engine mounts in the "engine bay"....

Sorry, but those engine mounts were the work of an earlier owner.  I only look at them now and then.

Re: Cockpit Floor Panels MOD

Sounds good. Looks good.  Squishie fuel line?  Why didn't I think of that?

wb

Re: Cockpit Floor Panels MOD

Just wondering if anyone out there has come up with a better system to hold down the cockpit floor panels ("engine room" access....).  I don't particularly like the idea of using wood screws and stringers, as the screw holes will eventually open up.  That and it takes a hell of a long time to get into the "engine room".  I was just wondering if anyone has tried using Camlocks or "hood pin" style fasteners.  I want to be able to get in there with a minimun of fuss and effort.  And I don't want it to leak.  I was also thinking of just replacing the wood stringers with some aluminum stringers.  Drill and tap.  And then use machine screws.  That would solve the issue of the screw holes opening up, but not so much the issue of me wanting to be able to get in easier.  On another note, the neighbors must have thought I was nuts, playing with my newly rebuilt Yanmar on the front lawn - pulling into some tropical anchorage. Sure sounds nice this time of year.  The little one lunger sounds nice too.  And this is probably the only time that I actually want to run the thing.  It is a sailboat after all.....  At least it didn't go BANG STOP, after all those hours this winter in the garage......